Information & Resources

A diverse range of educational and relevant information concerning Lactéol®, heat – treated micro – organisms, postbiotics, the microbiota and the consequences of dysbiosis are available here.

Information and Materials

What’s true and what’s false about heat – treated micro – organisms

There is a common misconception that only live micro – organisms are clinically effective. Heat - inactivated micro – organisms and their cell culture supernatants may be perceived as being ineffective as the bacteria are no longer living. If they are accepted as being effective, they may be perceived as having essentially the same mechanisms of action as probiotics, and hence the same efficacy, side effect profile and use considerations as live micro – organisms. However, these are all common misperceptions and the evidence dispels these myths.

A series of easy - to - read, True - or - False brochures has been developed to help healthcare professionals address these misconceptions.

They can be downloaded here:

Important news you might have missed

The official Postbiotic definition given by the ISAPP (International  Scientific Association of Probiotics and Prebiotics) just been published :
“A postbiotic is a preparation of inanimate microorganisms and/or their components that confers a health benefits on the host.”              

Publications about the microbiome and treatment guidelines

As researchers have discovered that the intestinal microbiome has a profound influence on health and healthy development, the pace of research in this area has accelerated considerably. This page provides links to recent selected Lactobacillus and microbiome research:

Zorzela L, et al. Is there a role for modified probiotics as beneficial microbes: a systematic review of the literature. Benef Microbes 2017;8(5):739-54

Our objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta - analysis for the use of modified (heat - killed or sonicated) probiotics for efficacy and safety to prevent and treat various diseases. Recent clinical research has focused on living strains of probiotics, but use in high - risk patients and potential adverse reactions including bacteraemia has focused interest on alternatives to the use of live probiotics. We searched MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Alt Health Watch, Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed, from inception to February 14, 2017 for randomised controlled trials involving modified probiotic strains. The primary outcome was efficacy to prevent or treat disease and the secondary outcome was incidence of adverse events. A total of 40 trials were included (n=3,913): 14 trials (15 arms with modified probiotics and 20 control arms) for the prevention of diseases and 26 trials (29 arms with modified probiotics and 32 control arms) for treatment of various diseases. Modified microbes were compared to either placebo (44%), or the same living probiotic strain (39%) or to only standard therapies (17%). Modified microbes were not significantly more or less effective than the living probiotic in 86% of the preventive trials and 69% of the treatment trials. Modified probiotic strains were significantly more effective in 15% of the treatment trials. Incidence rates of adverse events were similar for modified and living probiotics and other control groups, but many trials did not collect adequate safety data. Although several types of modified probiotics showed significant efficacy over living strains of probiotics, firm conclusions could not be reached due to the limited number of trials using the same type of modified microbe (strain, daily dose and duration) for a specific disease indication. Further research may illuminate other strains of modified probiotics that may have potential as clinical biotherapeutics.

Guarino A, et al. European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition/European Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases evidence - based guidelines for the management of acute gastroenteritis in children in Europe: update 2014. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2014;59:132-52

Four strains are recommended by the ESPGHAN, one of which is heat - treated Lactobacillus LB

Farthing M, et al. Acute diarrhea in adults and children: a global perspective. J Clin Gastroenterol 2013;47:12-20

Malagón-Rojas JN, et al. Postbiotics for preventing and treating common infectious diseases in children: a systematic review. Nutrients 2020;12

Postbiotics have recently been tentatively defined as bioactive compounds produced during a fermentation process (including microbial cells, cell constituents and metabolites) that supports health and/or wellbeing. Postbiotics are currently available in some infant formulas and fermented foods. We systematically reviewed evidence on postbiotics for preventing and treating common infectious diseases among children younger than 5 years. The PubMed, Embase, SpringerLink, and ScienceDirect databases were searched up to March 2019 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing postbiotics with placebo or no intervention. Seven RCTs involving 1740 children met the inclusion criteria. For therapeutic trials, supplementation with heat - treated Lactobacillus acidophilus LB reduced the duration of diarrhea (4 RCTs, n=224, mean difference, MD, -20.31 h, 95% CI -27.06 to -13.57). For preventive trials, the pooled results from two RCTs (n=537) showed that heat - inactivated L. paracasei CBA L74 versus placebo reduced the risk of diarrhea (relative risk, RR, 0.51, 95% CI 0.37-0.71), pharyngitis (RR 0.31, 95% CI 0.12-0.83) and laryngitis (RR 0.44, 95% CI 0.29-0.67). There is limited evidence to recommend the use of specific postbiotics for treating paediatric diarrhea and preventing common infectious diseases among children.

Salminen S, et al. The International Scientific Association of Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) consensus statement on the definition and scope of postbiotics.
Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2021. doi:10.1038/ s41575-021-00440-6.

In 2019, the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) convened a panel of experts specializing in nutrition, microbial physiology, gastroenterology, paediatrics, food science and microbiology to review the definition and scope of postbiotics. The term ‘postbiotics’ is increasingly found in the scientific literature and on commercial products, yet is inconsistently used and lacks a clear definition. The purpose of this panel was to consider the scientific, commercial and regulatory parameters encompassing this emerging term, propose a useful definition and thereby establish a foundation for future developments. The panel defined a postbiotic as a “preparation of inanimate microorganisms and/or their components that confers a health benefit on the host”. Effective postbiotics must contain inactivated microbial cells or cell components, with or without metabolites, that contribute to observed health benefits. The panel also discussed existing evidence of health-promoting effects of postbiotics, potential mechanisms of action, levels of evidence required to meet the stated definition, safety and implications for stakeholders. The panel determined that a definition of postbiotics is useful so that scientists, clinical triallists, industry, regulators and consumers have common ground for future activity in this area. A generally accepted definition will hopefully lead to regulatory clarity and promote innovation and the development of new postbiotic products.

Information sourced from programmed alerts for publications in the: NCCIH Clearinghouse, PubMed and MedlinePlus.

  1. Zorzela L, Ardestani SK, McFarland LV, Vohra S. Is there a role for modified probiotics as beneficial microbes: a systematic review of the literature. Benef Microbes 2017;8:739-54.
  2. Guarino A, Ashkenazi S, Gendrel D, Lo Vecchio A, Shamir R, Szajewska H. European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition/European Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases evidence-based guidelines for the management of acute gastroenteritis in children in Europe: update 2014. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2014;59:132-52.
  3. Farthing M, Salam MA, Lindberg G, et al. Acute diarrhea in adults and children: a global perspective. J Clin Gastroenterol 2013;47:12-20.
  4. Malagón-Rojas JN, Mantziari A, Salminen S, Szajewska H. Postbiotics for preventing and treating common infectious diseases in children: a systematic review. Nutrients 2020;12.
  5. Salminen S, et al. The International Scientific Association of Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) consensus statement on the definition and scope of postbiotics. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2021. doi:10.1038/ s41575-021-00440-6.

LACTÉOL®: TO FIGHT DIARRHEA

Lactéol® is an effective treatment for diarrhea, given in addition to rehydration and/or dietary measures, in both children and adults.1

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